Inspection

Last update: June 26, 2015

The act of determining the physical condition of a piece of equipment. Inspection can be achieved visually or through the use of advanced instrumentation, or both.

Inspections ensure the mechanical integrity and reliability of equipment for its intended service.

Special thanks to the following contributors:

Mohammed Aboul Gheit, KNPC, MAA

Recommend changes or revisions to this definition.

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Online Article
June 29, 2015

A new memorandum released by OSHA provides a list of 16 enforcement considerations that will be considered by an inspector when evaluating whether an employer is meeting the RAGAGEP requirements under the PSM standard. Here are 8 tips for addressing OSHA's new enforcement guidance.

Repair Strategies for Civil Structures Utilizing New Risk Based Inspection Methodology
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Amanda Nurse at BP, and Josh Havekost at BP

Assessing risk is an integral part of working at a refinery. Infrastructure supporting the miles of piping, process vessels, and the platforms and ladders used in daily unit operations are often taken for granted. The Civil Structures Management Program (CSMP) at the BP Whiting Refinery was developed in 2004. Since the program’s inception, millions of dollars have been spent in the yearly execution of refinery structural repairs.

Gains with Advanced Data Assessment in ILI: Leveraging pipeline data to eliminate risk, prioritize and schedule necessary repairs
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Ian D. Smith, P.Eng. at Quest Integrity Group, and Michael McGee at Quest Integrity Group

For traditional in-line inspection (ILI) vendors, considering 21.4 miles of a piggable 4” diesel pipeline is typically not a big deal. However, significant threats like 3rd party damage and external corrosion seem to come with the territory in nearly any pipeline territory.

There’s an Inspection App for That
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Barbara Lasseigne at Envoc

While performing visual inspections with a pen and notepad is the traditional way to record data, there are now more efficient ways to complete inspections out in the field. Investing in a mobile inspection application can be a great way to save time, reduce cost, and improve safety over traditional methods.

Combining High Resolution In-Line Geometry Tools and Finite Element Analysis to Improve Dent Assessments
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Rhett Dotson, P.E. at Stress Engineering Services

Historically, regulations regarding dent severity have been governed by one of two metrics: dent depth or strain. In the case of the former, plain dents with a depth up to 6% of the nominal diameter are permitted in both gas and liquid pipelines. However, many operators typically set stricter limits on dent depth targeting those above a depth of 2% for evaluation.

Advances in Inspectability & Validation of Non-Metallic Composite Repair Systems
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By David A. Hunter at Neptune Research, Inc.

In recent years, the growing use of composite repair systems for the rehabilitation of piping systems in the refining and chemical industries has increased the need for associated technologies for their manufacturing, installation, and inspection. One critical aspect of these repair systems is how to inspect and validate them for fitness for service. This article covers the testing completed for fiberglass and carbon fiber composite repair systems with specialty epoxy for full inspection capabilities.

May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Vibha Zaman, P.E. at Lloyd’s Register Energy Americas, and Peter Dsouza at Lloyd’s Register Energy Americas

Direct assessment is often seen as the best option to verify pipeline integrity. But, it's particularly challenging due to the difficulty of pipeline access, as well as the limitations in available technology to perform subsea wall thickness inspections. Addressing these challenges requires action rather than reaction.

Blog
June 8, 2015

There should be a policy in place and enforced by management at each operating site of not allowing equipment and repair recommendations to become overdue for inspection and handling. Such a practice goes a long way toward increasing the credibility of the inspection efforts at each operating site, as well sending the message that FEMI is just as important as other plant priorities.

The Benefits of Laser-Based Inspection
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Connie LaMorte at EWI, and Jon Jennings at EWI

Weld inspection using lasers is not new, but doing it 75 meters inside a pipe or streaming inspection data wirelessly is new. As laser technology has improved, more industries such as oil & gas are beginning to require laser inspection as part of their specifications. This non-contact method can help catch an unacceptable condition before it becomes too late to remedy the weld.

Testing and Inspection Methods to Improve the Life Cycle of Refractory
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Jeremy Wimberly at Sentinel Integrity Solutions

Refractory materials have significantly evolved during the past 15 years, testing technology is much more sophisticated, and the need for test technicians to be properly trained and experienced to use that technology is much more important than it has been in the past. Today, operators know that to ensure at least five to six year run times on processing units, production baffle testing and material prequalification and inspection processes and results are absolutely critical.

Achieve Comprehensive Reliability by Combining RBI and RCM
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Walt Sanford at PinnacleART

Today, many managers are finding that they can address the reliability of all types of assets by combining RBI and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) processes together into one comprehensive reliability management process.

Improving the turnaround lifecycle through careful planning, proper execution, and thorough documentation
Partner Content

Turnarounds are costly in terms of lost production. In many respects a turnaround can be even more complicated than the initial construction of the facility, so a carefully designed plan will reduce overall costs. After execution, safety reviews, Corrosion Monitoring Program updates, MOC documentation, and PHA Revalidations are a must.

Global, simultaneous inspection with Acoustic Emission Testing
Partner Content

AET is a powerful, non-intrusive inspection technique to verify the structural integrity of pressure vessels, spheres, high-temperature reactors and piping, coke drums, above-ground storage tanks, cryogenic storage tanks, and more.

Unmanned Aerial Systems and the Regulatory Landscape
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Nick Harwood at Aetos Group, and Aaron Cook at Aetos Group

The ability to gain this unique perspective has recently become easier and safer with today’s technological advancements. This new technology comes in the form of a miniature flying machine, better known as a drone or small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS). These systems can be a modified hobby aircraft or highly reliable, military grade aerial robots.

March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Matt Midas at GenesisSolutions

With the advancements in today’s technology and improvements to Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) systems and Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS), if we deploy them properly and in line with best practices, it is possible to reach previously unreachable levels of efficiency, data quality, and meaningful reports.

March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By A.C. Gysbers at The Equity Engineering Group, Inc.

The tubes of heat exchangers (HX), whether for a shell and tube bundle or an airfin, are typically subject to some form of nondestructive examination (NDE) to try and quantify the remaining wall thicknesses and corrosion rates to help a plant to determine remaining life or the need for intervention via re-tubing or replacement of these thin wall components.

Taking Inspection and Maintenance to New Heights with Rope Access
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Andy Kates at Versa Integrity Group

Rope access allows for a wide variety of work to be performed at high elevations or other hard to reach areas without the use of scaffolding or heavy equipment. It has evolved from techniques used in rock climbing and caving to become an extremely safe and cost effective industrial tool.