Piping

Last update: Jan 13, 2017

In every processing facility, you have feedstock and product that need to get from point A to point B. Piping is the vehicle that moves these liquids and gasses through a refinery or chemical processing plant. They can be made of steel, cast iron, copper, plastic, or other materials depending on the environment and materials being transported. Segments of pipe are often joined together using either bolted flanges or by welding pipes together. The major difference between piping and pipelines is that pipelines transport materials long distances between separate facilities or for distribution. Piping on the other hand is made to transport gasses and fluids, such as water or chemicals, within a single facility.[1]

There are several standards and recommended practices that apply to piping systems, including but not limited to: 

References

  1. http://www.exponent.com/pipelines/

 

Recommend changes or revisions to this definition.

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