ASME FFS-1 (Fitness-for-Service)

Last update: Jan 16, 2017

ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service (FFS), is a standard published by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) providing procedures for fitness-for-service assessments and/or rerating of equipment designed and constructed to recognized codes and standards, including international and internal corporate standards. The most recent version of this standard was published in July, 2016.

ASME FFS-1 covers both the present integrity of the component given a current state of damage and the projected remaining life. Qualitative and quantitative guidance for establishing remaining life and in-service margins for continued operation of equipment are provided in regards to future operating conditions and environmental compatibility. This standard can be used to evaluate flaws commonly encountered in pressure vessels, piping and tankage. The procedures are not intended to provide a definitive guideline for every possible situation that may be encountered. However, flexibility is provided to the user in the form of an advanced assessment level to handle uncommon situations that may require a more detailed analysis.

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Blog
January 5, 2015

There are numerous benefits to adding fitness-for-service (FFS) assessments to energy sector reliability projects. The acceptance of API 579/ASME FFS-1 is increasing across the energy sector and other industries, as these benefits have been demonstrated in a wide range of projects.

May/June 2014 Inspectioneering Journal
By Hugo Julien, P.E. at GCM Consultants, Serge Bisson at GCM Consultants, and Guy St-Arneault, P.E. at GCM Consultants

Inspections, repairs, modifications, or Fitness-For-Service (FFS) assessments on an old, unfired ASME Section VIII (Div. 1) pressure vessel - Which ASME Section VIII (Div. 1) Code Edition should you use?

Fitness for service: a powerful tool to keep your plant running safely
Partner Content

FFS assessment techniques are applicable to a wide range of damage types: LTA's, cracks, creep damage, dents, and more. These are very powerful analytical tools that often allow operators to not only keep the plant running, but to keep it running safely.

March/April 2014 Inspectioneering Journal
By Guy St-Arneault, P.E. at GCM Consultants, and Hugo Julien, P.E. at GCM Consultants

Since important decisions will be based on the results of the fitness-for-service (FFS) determination, you need to be sure that you have a strong FFS team. But what are the key ingredients of a good FFS team? This article provides some guidelines to help you answer this question.

Navigating ASME Section VIII (Div.1): Managing Your Pressure Vessels - Part 1
January/February 2014 Inspectioneering Journal
By Hugo Julien, P.E. at GCM Consultants, Serge Bisson at GCM Consultants, and Guy St-Arneault, P.E. at GCM Consultants

Inspections, repairs, modifications, or Fitness-For-Service (FFS) assessments on an old, unfired ASME Section VIII (Div. 1) pressure vessel - Which ASME Section VIII (Div. 1) Code Edition should you use?

When Bad Things Happen to Good Pressure Vessels: A Story of Localized Metal Loss
November/December 2013 Inspectioneering Journal
By Michael Turnquist at Quest Integrity Group

While there are many types of damage mechanisms that can occur in a piece of equipment, localized metal loss is one of the most common. If an inspection reveals that metal loss has occurred, many questions are raised...

Auto-Refrigeration / Brittle Fracture Prevention And Process Safety Mitigation
November/December 2013 Inspectioneering Journal
By Ralph E. King P.E. at Stress Engineering Services, Inc.

Auto-refrigeration is a process where an unintentional and/or uncontrolled phase change of a hydrocarbon from a liquid state to a vapor occurs, resulting in a very rapid chilling (refrigeration) of the liquid containing local equipment and/or piping. This phenomenon can result in a catastrophic ‘break-before-leak’ scenario commonly referred to as brittle fracture.

FFS using 3D Structured Light and Pipeline Integrity
September/October 2013 Inspectioneering Journal
By Joe Pikas at Technical Toolboxes

Even though oil and gas pipelines and their related facilities are generally safer for people and the environment compared to other means of transportation, occasional leaks and failures due to corrosion and other defects have become an issue in maintaining pipeline integrity.

September/October 2007 Inspectioneering Journal

The assessment procedures in this Standard can be used for Fitness-For-Service assessments and/or re-rating of equipment designed and constructed to recognized codes and standards, including international and internal corporate standards.

May/June 2005 Inspectioneering Journal
By Bob Stakenborghs, P.E. at Evisive Inc.

API is preparing to release the next edition of API 579 Fitness-For-Service (FFS) the first quarter of 2006. The many major enhancements that have been made to the next edition of API 579 will permit Owner-Users to evaluate new types of damage including HIC/SOHIC and Dentgouge combinations, and allow detailed remaining life assessments of components operating in the creep range. In addition, new procedures for stress analysis have been developed that will enhance the usability and accuracy o f Level 3 Assessments resulting in longer running times for damaged components.