Midstream

Last update: Jan 13, 2017

One of the three major sectors of the oil and gas business, Midstream refers to the transportation and storage of crude oil and natural gas. After production, petroleum products can be transferred by pipeline, rail, truck, oil tanker or barge for further refining and/or marketing. When not being transported, these products are temporarily held in storage tanks or floating storage vessels. A facility consisting of many storage tanks and transportation pipelines is referred to as a terminal. The other two major sectors of the oil and gas business are Upstream (exploration and production) and Downstream (refining and marketing).

 

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Ring in the New Year by Committing to a Culture of Safety
Blog
January 3, 2017 By Jeremiah Wooten at Inspectioneering, LLC.

At the end of every year, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) releases a list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the fiscal year, comprised from approximately 32,000 workplace inspections by federal OSHA staff.

July/August 2016 Inspectioneering Journal
By Neil Ferguson at Hydratight

Joint integrity management remain at the top of many operators’ priority list.  The discipline considers risk and drives safety to ensure we learn necessary lessons from past catastrophic failures, such as the Piper Alpha explosion in 1988, where leaking gas condensate ignited and killed 167 of the 229 people on board the offshore rig.

Standardized Pipeline Risk Comparison and Prediction
March/April 2016 Inspectioneering Journal
By Craig Alan Swift, P.E. at Bureau Veritas

The objective of this article is to demonstrate the inherent value of an interactive and detailed GIS landscape, emphasize the importance of industry standardization, and encourage regulatory agencies and operators to systematize and incorporate these technologies to produce a standardized basis of observation for these independently operated systems.

Ultrasonic Sensor System for Wall-Thickness Monitoring
March/April 2016 Inspectioneering Journal
By Dr. James N. Barshinger at Sensor Networks, Inc., Bruce A. Pellegrino at Sensor Networks, Inc., and Michael Nugent at Equity Engineering Group

While there are many methods for measuring equipment wall thickness, a predominant method used in the O&G and power generation industries is portable ultrasonic equipment. Ultrasonic testing is non-intrusive because it is applied to the outside of a pipe or vessel. It is an accurate and relatively low cost non-destructive examination (NDE) method to deploy in most situations.

Maintenance Strategies for Aboveground Storage Tanks in Crude Oil Service - Part II
January/February 2016 Inspectioneering Journal
By Melissa Ramkissoon at Petrotrin

In Part 1 of this 2-part series, published in the July/August 2015 issue of Inspectioneering Journal, I discussed corrosion control methods and some effective techniques for inspecting ASTs, and also identified several root causes of AST failures in crude oil service. In this second installment, I will briefly review the costs associated with AST failures and discuss maintenance strategies to help prevent and/or mitigate predictable and unforeseen incidents.

2015 is behind us – Let’s Look Ahead
January/February 2016 Inspectioneering Journal
By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

The enormous decline in oil prices over the past 14 months has definitely slowed projects and changed the energy and production landscape. Despite this, refineries, petrochemical plants, and chemical facilities must continue to run safely, responsibly, and reliably.

Composite Repairs for Offshore Pipelines
November/December 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By David A. Hunter at Neptune Research, Inc.

This study provides valuable information for offshore pipeline operators curious about how composite repair systems could be utilized with their assets.

3rd Party Joint Integrity Inspections: Compliance and Leak Free Facilities
July/August 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Neil Ferguson at Hydratight

With the increasing demand for oil, gas, and petrochemical products in a highly competitive market, products and services irrespective of their origin must satisfy customer quality requirements. Additionally, the needs to ensure quality control and regulatory compliance are now more scrutinized and critical than ever.

Partner Content

It is difficult to cover all inspection applications with basic inspection procedures like radiography, ultrasonics, magnetic particle testing, and dye penetrant inspection. Owner-operators are finding that advanced NDE services such as guided-wave ultrasonics, AUT corrosion mapping, and eddy current testing are essential tools to keep their facilities operating safely and efficiently.

API 1169 Pipeline Inspector Certification Program –  A Case for Why it Should be the Industry Standard
July/August 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Rikki Smith at Oilfield Jobs

Some hiring practices for new employees have been too lax for too long in the pipeline industry. Pipeline inspectors who have ever worked beside someone who was hired via the familiar “friends and family program,” recognize the need for more stringent hiring requirements than just knowing the right person.

A New Trend for Pipeline Integrity Management: How GIS and Risk-Based   Asset Management (RBA) Integration Can Improve Pipeline Management
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Dylan Schrader at PinnacleART, Tom Pickthall at EnhanceCo Inc., and Carlos A. Palacios at CiMA-TQ

Pipeline integrity is critical to ensure maintenance and operational efficiency; however it is becoming an increasingly challenging task for the energy industry. Maintenance managers and inspectors must make sure their pipeline(s) and its associated equipment meet strict integrity requirements and comply with regulations in order to avoid unnecessary downtime and mitigate safety and environmental risks.

The Industrial Internet’s Role in the Pipeline Industry
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Mauricio Palomino at GE Oil & Gas, Measurement & Control Business

Machine-to-Machine connectivity combined with advanced computing capabilities and industry-focused software enable a wide range of new capabilities. From smart homes controlled over the internet, to smart electric grids with smart meters, sensors and controls that continually monitor the performance of electric distribution and can self-adjust to demand and outage conditions to optimize uptime across the whole network or a combination of networks, the Industrial Internet has opened the door to a new era of efficiency, productivity, and safety for the industrial world.

Gains with Advanced Data Assessment in ILI: Leveraging pipeline data to eliminate risk, prioritize and schedule necessary repairs
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Ian D. Smith, P.Eng. at Quest Integrity Group, and Michael McGee at Quest Integrity Group

For traditional in-line inspection (ILI) vendors, considering 21.4 miles of a piggable 4” diesel pipeline is typically not a big deal. However, significant threats like 3rd party damage and external corrosion seem to come with the territory in nearly any pipeline territory.

Partner Content

It is difficult to cover all inspection applications with basic inspection procedures like radiography, ultrasonics, magnetic particle testing, and dye penetrant inspection. Owner-operators are finding that advanced NDE services such as guided-wave ultrasonics, AUT corrosion mapping, and eddy current testing are essential tools to keep their facilities operating safely and efficiently.

Combining High Resolution In-Line Geometry Tools and Finite Element Analysis to Improve Dent Assessments
May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Rhett Dotson, P.E. at Stress Engineering Services

Historically, regulations regarding dent severity have been governed by one of two metrics: dent depth or strain. In the case of the former, plain dents with a depth up to 6% of the nominal diameter are permitted in both gas and liquid pipelines. However, many operators typically set stricter limits on dent depth targeting those above a depth of 2% for evaluation.

May/June 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Vibha Zaman, P.E. at Lloyd’s Register Energy Americas, and Peter Dsouza at Lloyd’s Register Energy Americas

Direct assessment is often seen as the best option to verify pipeline integrity. But, it's particularly challenging due to the difficulty of pipeline access, as well as the limitations in available technology to perform subsea wall thickness inspections. Addressing these challenges requires action rather than reaction.

The Benefits of Laser-Based Inspection
March/April 2015 Inspectioneering Journal
By Connie LaMorte at EWI, and Jon Jennings at EWI

Weld inspection using lasers is not new, but doing it 75 meters inside a pipe or streaming inspection data wirelessly is new. As laser technology has improved, more industries such as oil & gas are beginning to require laser inspection as part of their specifications. This non-contact method can help catch an unacceptable condition before it becomes too late to remedy the weld.