Inspectioneering

Joint Integrity Management

Preventing leaks is extremely important for operators in the oil and gas and chemical processing industries. Joint Integrity Management is the practice of designing, inspecting, and maintaining bolted joints to prevent the occurrence of leaks, which can lead to delayed production, unplanned shutdowns, and process safety incidents. When leaks do occur, they can often be very costly. Thus, operators should always be looking for ways to prevent them from occurring in the first place.[1]

There are several essential elements in an effective joint integrity management program.[2]  They are:

  1. Ownership,
  2. Best Practices,
  3. Criticality Assessments,
  4. Proper Training,
  5. Record Keeping,
  6. In Service Inspections,
  7. Leak Management, and
  8. Learning and Continuous Improvement. 

When it comes to ownership, every joint integrity management program should have an established owner. This person needs to be responsible for implementing the program and carrying out periodic maintenance. They also need to be in charge of setting expectations for the program and monitoring its effectiveness. Next, it’s important to encourage the use of best practices when constructing joints. After construction, all joints should undergo criticality assessments. This helps to determine what types of inspection and testing they will need. Everyone involved with the program should be properly trained. They should know why the integrity management program is in place and how it works. Likewise, any personnel who inspect, repair, or install the joints should be properly trained in their job. Proper records should be kept on all activities performed on all joints. Having this information is helpful for future inspections and maintenance activities. In-service inspections are important for any joint integrity management program. Everyone involved with the management program should be trained to effectively gather data on the joints.[2] 

This information should be reviewed regularly in order to establish trends. Ultimately, the point of all of these tasks is to preserve the integrity of the joint and to manage and prevent leaks. Beyond just prevention, another significant part of leak management is dealing with leaks when they occur. This includes both repairing the leak and determining why it happened.

Finally, it is important to periodically review the leak reports, inspection data, and system records. This should be done in order to determine how effective the system is and how it can be improved in the future.[2]
 

References

  1. http://www.hydratight.com/sites/default/files/downloads/media/ht-jims-e-06-08-hydratight-jims-brochure-uk.pdf
  2. http://www.wellheadservices.net/techdocs/guidance_on_bolted_joints.pdf

 

REGISTER FOR INSPECTIONEERING'S WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

Join 8,000+ fellow asset integrity professionals! Get Inspectioneering's latest information straight to your inbox. Enter your information below:

Articles
    Videos
      White Papers
        Downloads & Resources
          Events
            Related News
            • Hydratight completes pipeline upgrade project in Western Australia
              Industry News
              Hydratight, June 10, 2016

              Joint integrity specialist Hydratight has completed an upgrade project on a section of subsea pipeline on the North West Shelf of Western Australia.

            • Industry News
              Hydratight, September 23, 2014

              Hydratight, the market leading joint integrity assurance company, recently confirmed its leadership position and its belief to be the world’s first ASME PCC-1-2013 Appendix A Qualifying Organization, following an independent audit by a team from Lloyd's Register Energy, led by their UK Managing Surveyor for ASME inspection services.

            • Industry News
              Fuel Fix, August 12, 2014

              A recent report from an investigation of a 2012 incident in which a bolt used to affix emergency equipment to a subsea well in the Gulf of Mexico failed, has identified hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking as the reason for the failure. Investigators have since advised the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement to encourage the industry to develop "a consistent set of standards for connections and connection fasteners" used in subsea oil and gas equipment, with clear guidance on material hardness, and to improve its quality management standards to address the use of manufacturers’ subcontractors.

            • Industry News
              March 26, 2014

              Joint integrity is the cornerstone of safe and leak-free operations and proper assembly is one of the primary factors integral to the integrity of a bolted joint.


              Inspectioneering Journal

              Explore over 20 years of articles written by our team of subject matter experts.

              Company Directory

              Find relevant products, services, and technologies.

              Job Postings

              Discover job opportunities that match your skillset.

              Event Calendar

              Find upcoming conferences, training sessions, online events, and more.

              Industry News

              Stay up-to-date with the latest inspection and asset integrity management news.

              Blog

              Read short articles and insights authored by industry experts.

              Asset Intelligence Reports

              Download brief primers on various asset integrity management topics.

              Videos

              Watch educational and informative videos directly related to your profession.