Inspectioneering

1998 Inspectioneering Journal Article Index


  • January/February 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Mark Bell at Ethos Mechanical Integrity Solutions

    Inspection record systems, used to be just that, a place to "record" data. Our industry has spent many millions of dollars collection data to put into our "record" systems. The problem was trying to manage and utilize the millions of pieces of information (not being a computer type, a piece of information to me is a piece of information, not a Byte). A statistician with my company recently compared our management of information with trying to get a drink of water from a fire water hose. The information is there, but good luck trying to use it.

  • March/April 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Mark Bell at Ethos Mechanical Integrity Solutions

    In Part 1 of my article that appeared in the previous edition of the IJ, I focused on several issues that are vital to the successful application of any inspection information management system. In Part 2 of my article, I will concentrate on several additional important issues.

  • January/February 1998 Inspectioneering Journal

    TODF (time-of-flight-diffraction) is proposed as an option to Pulse-echo methods by some practitioners. It suffers from shortcomings that can limit its effectiveness.

  • July/August 1998 Inspectioneering Journal

    The debate about advantages and drawbacks of the application of the TOFD (time of flight diffraction) approach for ultrasonic weld inspection should not forget the original reasons for its introduction in the 1960s. The major advantage at that time had been the better crack detection in comparison to x-ray techniques, especially in view of an increased use of steels and welding technologies with a the presence of diverse cracking phenomena (e.g. cold cracking, transverse cracks etc.).

  • September/October 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Bernie Weber at Det Norske Veritas

    Quality failure rate data have long been needed by the Chemical Process Industry. Unfortunately, the emphasis too often has been on the collection of data rather than on its uses . One must answer the question of what to do with the data once it has been collected. The type of information that would allow more effective continuous improvement is often collected without any real thought other than, "sounds like we should have it," or "we might need it someday." Data collection is typically driven by perceived data requirements, regulatory requirements, and data that make day-to-day work assignments more efficient or provide proof of work performed.

  • May/June 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Paul K. Davidson at WIS, Inc.

    During the past year, WIS has presented a number of papers about EMATs. The type of discussions that have followed the presentations has surprised us. The overall view of industry to EMATs has been: "Aren't EMATs still just a good lab tool? There aren't any commercial applications out there."

  • September/October 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    I have observed through literally hundreds of discussions and reading numerous articles on risk-based approaches that at least one potential business pitfall is appearing when owner-operators choose to begin with a "Level 1" (very qualitative) approach. They may not have the confidence to take advantage of re-allocating resources from the "low" risk equipment to the "higher" risk equipment.

  • January/February 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Mark Badrick at Bahrain Petroleum Company

    The use of Infrared Thermal Imagers, particularly for temperature measurement within an operating furnace environment, is reliant on the accurate evaluation of specific parameters, which the pyrometer requires in order to produce true temperature measurements.

  • May/June 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued the report on this catastrophic failure that involved two storage tanks in a Pennsylvania refinery. The report issued March 20, 1998, stated that while both tanks had roof replacements since their initial construction, no further information was available about routine inspection or maintenance procedures.

  • May/June 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Roland A. Goodman at American Petroleum Institute

    The API Subcommittees on Inspection and Pressure Vessels & Tanks are ever vigilant in keeping up with current trends and state-of-the-art technology for in-service inspection of pressure vessels, process piping, and aboveground storage tanks. One result of this effort is the recognition of risk-based inspection (RBI) methods by the API inspection codes (API 510, 570, and 653) as a valid methodology for developing an inspection strategy.

  • September/October 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    In this first part of a two-part article, I will outline a process that our company uses to review and measure the effectiveness of our pressure equipment integrity management process. Then in Part 2, next issue, I will "fill in the blanks" on some specific issues that we measure.

  • November/December 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    In Part 1 of this article, in the last edition of the IJ, I introduced the work process that we use to assess the effectiveness of our pressure equipment integrity (PEI) management. It involves a self-assessment workbook filled out by site personnel, which is in turn reviewed and validated by a team of company auditors from outside the site. I also introduced the seven major categories of assessment that we conduct.

  • Pendulum Effect No. 3
    July/August 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Del Underwood at Det Norske Veritas

    In a past issue, we discussed one solution to the instrument line block valve pendulum problem. This was where the valve assembly can be mounted remotely from the vibrating product line, such as at-grade. This issue covers two possibilities where the valves need to remain close to the vibrating line.

  • July/August 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Constance Reichert at Edison Welding Institute

    Visual inspection is the most common nondestructive testing method. For critical applications, machine vision technology provides advantages over visual inspection.

  • July/August 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Roy Schuyler at DuPont DeNemours, Inc.

    Regulatory, civic and competitive pressures require we change to a proactive, rather than a reactive culture or environment with a supportive infrastructure. The concurrent evolution of cultural and infrastructural change relies upon effective leadership, communication and commitment (both philosophically and financially) to create an environment which not only promotes but supports/facilitates (no mixed signals) “healthy” progress, that can be measured.

  • March/April 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Richard D. Roberts at Quest Integrity Group, and Tim Cowling

    Furnace tubes in the petrochemical and refining industries lengths' can exceed 2,000 ft., often with multiple serpentine bends. This can make them extremely difficult to inspect using conventional NDE methods. The following inspection tool (FTIS) employs the combined capabilities of high-speed laser and advanced ultrasonic wall thickness measurements and is propelled through the piping via a column of clean water which provides a path for the laser beam, and the coupling for the ultrasonic signals.

  • May/June 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Richard D. Roberts at Quest Integrity Group, and Tim Cowling

    Part 1 included a review of current tube inspection practices in convection and radiant sections of heaters/furnaces in the refining and chemical industries. The authors also presented a new inspection device combining laser image mapping of the internal surface of tubes and ultrasonic thickness mapping.

  • Facilities Terrified as Inspection Contractors Continue “Old Fashioned” Methods.
    Partner Content

    It’s a scary thought to think that with all the new advancements in technology, some facilities still rely on traditional inspection contractors that perform out of date procedures. You rely on technology to keep your home and identity safe, so why run the risk of hiring inspection contractors without technological solutions to provide the vital information needed to keep your facility safe.

  • September/October 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Bruce A. Pellegrino at Sensor Networks, Inc.

    Remote visual testing (RVT) of large surface areas (1 sq. meter) associated with vessel inspection requires a unique hardware approach compared to that of commercially-available borescopes, fiberscopes, and video borescopes. Faced with stricter OSHA regulations and the increased global competitiveness of today's marketplace, process facilities have looked toward a technical solution, including man-less entry into vessels, pressure vessels, and tanks for their internal inspections. A unitized pan, tilt, light, color, zoom video inspection system was developed for use in confined space and hazardous area locations associated with these components.

  • January/February 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    There is a potential for misconceptions about terms used regarding risk by non-risk management professionals. Understand that some risk is unavoidable. We can attempt to minimize risk to any extent desired, but without an effective process that addresses all the parameters we consider important it is more likely our level of effectiveness will suffer. There is more to these considerations than the likelihood of failure, which most inspection, materials and corrosion specialists understand.

  • September/October 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal, and Paul Barringer at Barringer & Associates

    Inspection to determine mechanical integrity is important to verify that equipment is suitable for intended use, i.e. to prevent or minimize the consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive chemicals as required by OSHA 1910.119 - Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (and other jurisdictional codes).

  • May/June 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Mike Badeen at Phillips 66 Co.

    New inspection technology, when added to the proven practice of using tell tale holes (TTHs), proves effective in reducing significant releases and or catastrophic events that are related to internal corrosion / erosion of process piping. In fact, one facility's experience indicates that this practice, when used in conjunction with current and newly advanced technology such as automated ultrasonic (AUT) and profile radiograph (PRT), is more effective than using only new technology.

  • November/December 1998 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Michael Twomey at CONAM Inspection Inc., and Jay N. Rothbart at Conam Inspection Inc.

    We have been asked many times by existing and prospective users of PCMS (a computerized, inspection database management system), how many TMLs (Thickness Management Locations) should be installed per piping circuit. These inquiries must be addressed indirectly, because each specific site differs in its operation, mission and objectives. We firmly believe it is up to each site to make choices based upon their own circumstances. When pressed on the issue we have pointed toward a couple of papers published or generated within our User Community. While these provide cookbook methods, they do not encompass all the issues facing the User Group. Based upon the continuing questions in this area we decided to provide a review of the issues.


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