Inspectioneering

1996 Inspectioneering Journal Article Index


  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal

    Task Group T-1G-24 on Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) Pipe and Accessories in Oilfield Service is working on a test method for evaluating the compatibility of FRP tubulars in oilfield environments. They hope to submit a draft for ballot shortly. To vote on this draft, join Unit Committee T-1G.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Del Underwood at Det Norske Veritas, and Tim Munsterman at Det Norske Veritas

    Last issue, in keeping with the evaluation that "gussets are stiffeners, not strengtheners," we discussed welding around the ends of the gusset plate instead of just along the sides in order to reduce the stress concentration. A further improvement in the gusset life can be obtained by welding it to a reinforcing plate and/or a fitting instead of directly to the pipe.

  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Del Underwood at Det Norske Veritas

    This final issue on gusset problems will discuss why gussets are "stiffeners" rather than "strengtheners." The effective load bearing capacity of a member of given strength is based upon how large a cross-sectional area is carrying the load. Gussets are commonly welded to tubular members to reduce their flexure under a bending load.

  • November/December 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    The API-570 Piping Inspector Certification Program is nearing the end of the grandfather period. Five hundred thirty-one (531) inspectors have been certified to date under this provision, which will remain in effect through November 15, 1996.

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By P.E. Myers at Chevron Research & Technology Co.

    This case study is an example of an incident that started with a routine API 653 inspection and resulted in a very difficult repair to a tank bottom contaminated with hydrocarbons on the underside. This case highlights the potential risks with performing tank inspections and the consequences of poor inspection practices.

  • November/December 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Shaun W. Lawson at Mechatronic Systems and Robotics Research Group, University of Surrey

    The basic approach to the inspection and repair procedure for welding has barely altered for three decades. The normal practice has continued to be to inspect a weld only after the welding programme is complete. Thus by the time a defect is detected, considerable time and money has been spent on completing the welding of a rejectable component. Furthermore, a large number of additional weld runs will generally have been deposited over the defect, thus increasing the cost of repair and decreasing the quality of the component.

  • September/October 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    "Inspection and testing procedures shall follow recognized and generally accepted good engineering practice," can mean many things to many people. Fortunately, organizations like API, NACE, ASME, etc. have taken the initiative in establishing many of these practices for decades.

  • September/October 1996 Inspectioneering Journal

    This article is a practical review of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) methods that can be used to find Erosion/Corrosion (E/C) and/or Corrosion wear in fossil fuel power piping systems. The article is based on experience with PG&E's E/C detection program for fossil fuel power plants.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Charles L. Foster at Pacific Gas & Electric

    A picture is worth a thousand words and thousands of dollars. There are many instances where in-service inspection reports are greatly enhanced by including photographic documentation. Using a conventional, high-quality 35 mm camera requires cumbersome amounts of equipment and consumes a lot of time. Developing film ASAP is an additional trip away from the inspection site and is an immediate necessity to ensure picture quality before the area is no longer accessible.

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    Are your jurisdictional boiler and/or pressure vessel rules and regulations too stringent, too costly, too bureaucratic, without adding real safety value commensurate with the time and resources necessary for compliance? Are you having to hire third party inspectors to perform boiler and/or pressure vessel inspections, when you have fully qualified, competent inspection resources on staff? Are you having to shut down safe, reliable boilers and/or pressure vessels annually (or bi-annually) just to comply with outdated boiler and/or pressure vessel (B&PV) inspection requirements? If the answer to any of these questions is "yes" for your company, read on: you may be interested to know that times are changing.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    There are a lot of vital roles in the success of any refinery or petrochemical process plant. But none are more important to success than that filled by the pressure equipment inspector (PEI). Years back, we recognized that world class pressure equipment integrity and reliability was critical to our success. Engineering management knew that if we didn't have that, we could not succeed in our business strategy, no matter how good we were at all other necessary functions.

  • November/December 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Michael Twomey at CONAM Inspection Inc.

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is a real threat to the onstream reliability of many of today's plants. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localized corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can be catastrophic in nature, or at least, have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs.

  • Partner Content

    Our proprietary furnace tube inspection system, FTIS™, is an ultrasonic inspection technology capable of rapid, automated fired heater coil inspection in refinery fired heaters. The data captured by our furnace tube inspection system is exceptionally powerful when combined with our LifeQuest™ remaining life assessment capabilities, providing an integrated solution set for refinery fired heaters in the refining and chemical industries.

  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal

    In today's environmental and legal climate, industry is looking for guaranteed high reliability of vessel quality for most chemical fluids. Failures are more costly than in the past due to: 1. environmental laws and requirements 2. emphasis on safety and plant/personnel protection 3. exposure to civil suits and fear of high cost judgments 4. increasing cost of shut downs

  • July/August 1996 Inspectioneering Journal

    All FRP tanks should be fabricated to a national standard as a basic requirement. Additional requirements may be appropriate and should be agreed to by the purchaser and fabricator. Very acceptable basic standards are...

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Yehuda Dror at DNV Certification, Inc.

    The ISO 9000 series of standards is one of the fastest growing quality initiatives in the world. Nearly 100,000 certificates of compliance with ISO 9000 standards have been issued in some 80 countries, including over 8,000 certificates in the U.S. But what are the standards? How do they work? And how do they apply to an inspection company?

  • July/August 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Hegeon Kwun at Southwest Research Institute, and Richard L. Lopushanksy at Southwest Research Institute

    Engineers and scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas, may have found a cost-effective and practical method of detecting ID and OD corrosion of insulated piping systems.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Dr. G. Fulop at Maxtech International, Inc.

    A recent in-depth analysis of nondestructive Testing Services Markets indicates that after very slow overall growth in 1993 and 1994, these markets have resumed growing in 1995. The combined U.S. and Canadian market for nondestructive testing services reached $627 million in 1995 and is expected to grow to $731 million by 1999. The strongest growth is anticipated in the Chemical/Petrochemical and "Other" industries segments.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By George Jones at ERA Technology, Inc.

    On-line condition monitoring concepts which have originally been applied to vibration monitoring of rotating equipment are now being applied to monitoring the structural integrity of power plant components. Market demand for more flexible plant operation is dictating the need to reduce operating costs by demanding increased run times and reliability and by reducing the length of outages.

  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Rolland E. Stroup at JBF Associates, Inc.

    Since OSHA began issuing citations under the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard (29 CFR 1910.119), the relative frequency of citations related to some subsections of the regulation has increased dramatically, while the frequency of others has decreased just as dramatically. Has OSHA changed its focus over time? Will there be new trends in the future? These issues can be better understood by looking at citation history and the continuing deadlines built into the regulation.

  • November/December 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Lynne Kaley at Trinity Bridge LLC / Trinity Bridge Digital, Eivind Johnsen at DNV Inc., and Andy Tallin at DNV Inc.

    Petroleum coke production is an important source of revenue for many refineries. While coking units were initially constructed to deal with a waste product, these units are now of significant economic value.

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Richard S. Boswell, P.E. at Stress Engineering Services, Inc., and Tom Farraro at CITGO Petroleum Corp.

    A pair of delayed coker drums was placed in service in 1968, and now have 28 years of service in what may be the most severe cyclic loading conditions of any petrochemical vessels. They are a conventional ASME VIII/Div 1 pressure vessel design based on 60 psi and 836 degrees Fahrenheit at the top and 899 degrees Fahrenheit at the bottom. This design provides increasing thickness, from the bottom up, in seven rings constructed with clad plates, using longitudinal and circumferential weld seams.

  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Richard S. Boswell, P.E. at Stress Engineering Services, Inc., and Tom Farraro at CITGO Petroleum Corp.

    A set of delayed coker drums was placed in service in 1968, and now have 27 years of service in what may be the most violent and severe cyclic loading conditions of any petrochemical vessel. As part of the continuous evaluation of their integrity, surface contour measurements were performed to document the growth of the bulges.

  • July/August 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Richard S. Boswell, P.E. at Stress Engineering Services, Inc.

    A set of delayed coker drums were placed in service in 1968, and now have 27 years of service in what may be the most violent and severe cyclic loading conditions of any petrochemical vessel. As part of the continuous evaluation of their integrity, surface contour measurements were performed to document the growth of the bulges.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Will Carter at ASME Post Construction Committee

    In June of 1995, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Council on Codes and Standards approved the formation of a new main committee, the Post Construction Committee (PCC). The action culminated the activities of a Task Group on Post Construction. The Task Group studied the need for post-construction standards for pressurized equipment constructed per ASME Codes and Standards.

  • January/February 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Jim Yukes at Russell Technologies, Inc.

    The Remote Field Electromagnetic Technique, often referred to as RFEC (remote field eddy current), is used to identify corrosion in ferromagnetic tubes. Available for less than ten years, many people are not familiar with its applications.

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Greg Alvarado at Inspectioneering Journal

    We all have a responsibility to perform the best job we can for our employers/customers. That is why I am sharing my thoughts with you, my clients, the Inspectioneering Journal readers. In 12 years of being on the owner/user side of the fence, as a chief chemist for NL (National Lead) Industries and a senior member of the materials engineering and corrosion staff for Monsanto Chemical Company, combined with another 9 years in the role of marketing, consulting and sales of NDE and engineering services to the process sectors, I have seen where we often become our own worst enemy. Yes, I mean either as the service provider or the client.

  • September/October 1996 Inspectioneering Journal

    The August 1 signing allows the DOE (Department of Energy) direct access to all Responsible Care resource materials, workshops, seminars, regional meetings, newsletters and on-line services. Responsible Care references/covers mechanical integrity & inspection aspects in addition to many others related to the safe and responsible operating of chemical facilities.

  • September/October 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    In the January 1995 issue, I introduced the concept of Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) being developed by an API (American Petroleum Institute) project. This article is an update and status report on that project, which now has 20 sponsor companies, and more joining each quarter.

  • November/December 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By John Reynolds at Intertek

    Three levels of risk based inspection have been developed by the API sponsor group. Level 1: Qualitative RBI which utilizes a step-by-step workbook to rank entire process units or process systems into a 5 x 5 risk matrix...

  • May/June 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Walter G. Reuter at INEL

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has a substantial interest in predictions for fitness-for-service as well as for lifetime extension. The ability to predict fitness-for-service is applicable to making initial lifetime prediction; making a repair, replace, or continue to operate decision when a defect is found that exceeds applicable codes and evaluating the ability to extend the lifetime of structural components.

  • March/April 1996 Inspectioneering Journal
    By Steven L. Braune, P.E. at AEC Engineering, Inc.

    Since the publication of API Standard 653, Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration and Reconstruction in early 1991 it has gained wide acceptance within the petroleum and chemical industries. In addition, six states (Alaska, Arkansas, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington) have referred to or incorporated API-653 into their petroleum AST regulations. At the very least, API-653 has become the new buzz word throughout the industry and the phrase "inspected in conformance with API-653" is tossed around freely in most inquiries for inspection services.

  • Fitness for service: a powerful tool to keep your plant running safely
    Partner Content

    FFS assessment techniques are applicable to a wide range of damage types: LTA's, cracks, creep damage, dents, and more. These are very powerful analytical tools that often allow operators to not only keep the plant running, but to keep it running safely.


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